Author: Misty Staff

What Can the Misty II Platform Do?

There are a few standard options for controlling a Misty II robot. To control Misty manually and experiment with the robot’s functionality, you can send individual HTTP requests to more than 150 endpoints. Each endpoint invokes a command to do an action, obtain some data, or start a process (move head, move arms, drive, start […]

Misty II Project Directory, Part 3: Tools, Sandboxes, & Other Inventions

Welcome back! Part 1 of this series collected a list of skills from the Misty II developer community, and Part 2 included links to sample code maintained by the Misty Robotics organization. Part 3 focuses on community-created tools, experiments, and other inventions that provide new ways to explore the platform and use Misty’s capabilities. Each […]

Misty II Project Directory, Part 2: Sample Code

Welcome back! In Part 1 of this series, we published a list of community-shared skills and robot applications for you to explore. Part 2 continues by gathering links to skills and sample code maintained by the Misty Robotics organization. Whether you’re learning to use Misty’s REST API, JavaScript SDK, or .NET SDK (Beta), these examples […]

Misty II Project Directory, Part 1: Community Skills

Credit for the images in the banner collage belongs to developers from the Misty Community. Since Misty’s launch, the developer community has built and shared a vibrant collection of skills, controller applications, development tools, and other projects for the Misty II platform. Part of our work in promoting these efforts is to make sure these […]

Building the Misty Two-Factor Authentication Skill

Designed to look friendly and approachable, it’s understandable when people at first confuse Misty for a toy. Make no mistake, Misty’s capabilities mean she is ready to take on serious tasks. It’s these capabilities that are necessary to bring your code to life in the 3D world the way Misty does.  Last month, as we […]

Misty’s Capacitive Touch Sensors

Misty has more than 25 sensors, six of which are capacitive touch sensors. Adam Citarella, Misty Robotics’ Senior Software Engineer, describes them as “the least specific intended use” sensors but that doesn’t mean they’re not important. We spoke to Adam about what capacitive touch sensors are, why Misty has them, how they can be leveraged […]